Dr. Mercola on the Dangers of Antibiotics in Beef

As we are on the topic of beef, here is a link to an interesting article and as from Dr. Mercola on the dangers of the increased use of antibiotics in meat production:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/10/29/antibiotics-meat-production.aspx

The following PBS video, part one of a series, is also worth a view:

Rare Footage of a Milanesa in Progress

Today on Halfwayfoods, we bring you rare footage of a Milanesa, the delicious breaded flank steak that is a staple in South America.  It is brief, but so delicious you can practically smell it!

Burger a la Paleo

The other night we ran out of hamburger buns, little did we know there is a name for burgers eaten sans bun:

Paleo Style

Burger Paleo Style!
Burger Paleo Style!

Even if the full on diet is not for you, taking down a burger paleo style every now and then is a nice way to mix things up!

La Casa del Sillpancho

For those who are unaware, the dish that is our namesake here at halfwayfoods is one of the most delicious and well rounded in all of Bolivian cuisine.  The Silpancho is a steak that is flattened with a stone until it is round, breaded, fried and placed on a be of rice and potatoes.  The masterpiece is complete when it is topped with a fried egg and a salad which best resembles pico de gallo for those of us in the northern hemisphere.

Like a hamburger up north, one needs to know where to find a good Silpancho.  When searching for such a place, we pass along a strikingly simple way to assure that you will be served a fresh Silpancho, passed along to us by our father-in-law, a Bolivian food connaisseur:  Eat at a busy restaurant.

La Casa del Sillpancho - Cochabamba, Bolivia
La Casa del Sillpancho – Cochabamba, Bolivia

Such a place in Cochabamba, where arguably the best Silpanchos on the planet are served, is called the “Palacio del Silpancho, which is located just off the plaza 25 de mayo.  On Avenida America rests another worthy Silpancheria, “La Casa del Sillpancho.”  One will note their use of the double LL, which in this case is a throwback to the Quechua origins of the dish (the Quechua spelling is Sillp’anchu).

Next time you find yourself in Cochabamba, don’t miss this culinary treat, along with the choco burger and anitcuchos from the vendors on Villaroel.